Subject Pages

History - Recommended Sources

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This archive contains analysis, research, debates and speeches from the Royal Institute of International Affairs from 1920-2008. Topics covered include the Spanish Civil War, the Cold War, energy security, nuclear disarmament, decolonisation etc. You can also listen to recordings of meetings and speeches as well as seeing the transcript in many cases.

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A brilliant source containing essays, maps, primary sources and an interactive chronology on the theme of Empire across the last 5 centuries

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Read in-depth coverage about empires across the world from ancient to modern times. Entries include the Suez Crisis of 1956, the partition of Africa, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Dutch East Indies, propaganda and empire, decolonization in the French and British empires, postcolonialism and much more. 

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A high quality online reference source bought specially for the early modern History courses at Portsmouth.

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Digital images of a wide range of original documents, including diaries, letters, personal narratives, trench journals, scrapbooks etc. Supplementing the primary sources is a wealth of secondary resources including interactive maps, 360° panoramas and walk-throughs of the Sanctuary Wood Trench System, the Memory Wall, In Their Own Words feature, scholarly essays, a chronology and glossaries. The Visual Perspectives and Narratives module has greater emphasis on the role of women, plus the home front.

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The full text of thousands of books published in Britain from 1475 to 1900. This collection comprises Early English Books Online (EEBO) and Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO), plus nineteenth century books from the British Library collection.

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Search or browse one of the most detailed primary sources for the history of Britain and its former colonies. Reports from army officers serving abroad are included, as well as Command Papers, Bills, Committee reports. Hansard is available from 1803.

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Access a range of primary and secondary sources covering London from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. As well as documents, you will find interactive maps, illustrations and photographs to really bring the streets to life.

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A key source about daily life in the 20th century. You can look at topic collections (1938-65) on juvenile delinquency, holidays, leisure, industry etc., or view diary entries (1939-51) and day surveys. File reports (1937-1972) cover subjects such as propaganda, morale, popular culture, shopping, sex, fashion and much more.

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Migration to New Worlds explores the movement of people from Britain, Europe and Asia to the New World and Australasia. Thematic areas include motives for emigration, port conditions and organisation and journey conditions.

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Explore documents, fanzines, photos and newsreel footage to help understand these key decades when consumer culture and pop music took off and protest movements were big news.

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This key resource for the early modern period brings you original historical documents ranging from high level international politics and diplomacy to the charges against a steward for poisoning people. The correspondence, reports, memoranda, and parliamentary drafts from ambassadors, civil servants and provincial administrators present a full picture of Tudor and Stuart Britain.

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A fantastic online collection containing everything from the full-text of books, to posters and performance tickets. Highly recommended by Portsmouth lecturers

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A gateway to thousands of the UK’s richest archives held in over 220 institutions across the country. The Archives Hub helps you discover unique and often little-known sources to support your research.

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This fantastic resource has captured UK terrestrial TV and radio programmes from 2007 onwards for anyone in UK universities to watch for free. Look out for all the useful documentaries.

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Papers, notebooks and casebooks from the survey into London life and labour, 1886-1903. Booth family papers are also included.

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An invaluable research tool providing biographical information about individual clergymen and the succession of clergy in individual parishes. You will also find details about patrons, schools and schoolteachers.

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If you want to trace details about a specific person or place, or perhaps need inspiration for creative writing, this could be just what you need!  Connected Histories provides an all-in-one search across electronic content available on various sites such as 19th Century British Pamphlets, the Clergy of the Church of England, Charles Booth Archive, Convict Transportation Registers, Proceedings of the Old Bailey, British Newspapers 1600-1900 etc. If you find something useful on a resource we pay for e.g. British Newspapers, you may need to follow the link to that resource from the Finding Articles page within these Subject Pages.

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A high quality alternative to Wikipedia – also containing dictionaries - which even shows you how to reference items found. Try out the 'mind map' option to see how your keyword links to others - useful for essay planning and dissertation work.

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Links to primary historical documents that are transcribed, reproduced in facsimile, or translated.

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Use one search to look across over 18 million digital items from 48 libraries across Europe. Look out for the Historic Newspapers link which lets you view a range of newspapers from the 19th and early twentieth centuries.

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A cultural gateway into documents and images from across Europe.

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Digitised documents, images and film of the First World War contributed by members of the public to a project hosted by the University of Oxford.

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Digitised local studies collections from across Hampshire.

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The UK national centre for History based at Senate House, University of London.

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This gives a wide range of statistics on population, education, (un)employment, agriculture, industry, motor vehicles, railways, TV and radio etc. 

Data can be viewed as PDF (downloadable) or Excel format which can then be exported. When you use the search box beware - it is not just searching this source but the whole of Palgrave's e-books (which we have bought via Ebook Central where applicable). You can narrow down to this resource by using Advanced Search and selecting International Historical Statistics in the Book Collection box. Click the Reference Products button if you want to get back to the stats home page quickly.

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Advice about accessing online archives produced for UK university students

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An online archive of printed material covering aspects of everyday life in Britain in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. You will find posters and handbills for theatrical and non-theatrical entertainments, broadsides relating to murders and executions, book and journal prospectuses, popular topographical prints, and a wealth of different kinds of printed advertising material.

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Over 240,000 manuscript and printed pages providing historical records on over 3.35 million people. Facilities are provided to allow you to link together records relating to the same individual, and to compile biographies of the best documented individuals (free registration required if you want to do this).

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The Royal Naval Museum, in Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard, is one of Britain’s oldest maritime museums. The Museum’s aim is to preserve and present the history of the 'Fleet' - the ships and the men and women who manned them.

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The national record of over 58,000 men and women who have shaped British history and culture, worldwide, from the Romans to the 21st century – extremely useful for detailed biographies about literary figures.

You can log onto this using your Public Library membership number in the Library Card Login box.

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World War I image archive

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London’s Central Criminal Court records 1674-1913 – just under 200,000 trial details are available.

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Useful advice defining primary sources, then how to find and evaluate them on the web. This is provided by the American Library Association so some of the sources mentioned are most useful for those doing American history.

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A major collection on women’s history held within the London School of Economics and Political Science Library but available to those who need to use it.

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Produced in 2014, this site includes around 500 sources from across Europe. It examines key themes such as origins of the war, race, empire and colonial troops, propaganda, life for soldiers and civilians. A historical debates section looks at how historians’ views of the war have changed over time.

Books for History units can be found on all three floors of the University Library. Specific classmarks of interest include:

decolonization
early modern Europe
empire
French Revolution
historiography
history of England & Wales
history of Germany & neighboring central European countries
history of Russia & neighboring east European countries
history of slavery
history of the British Isles
history of The Netherlands
local history: Hampshire
nineteenth century Europe
philosophy & theory of history
social class history
The Holocaust
witchcraft
women’s history
World War II

Your Subject Team

Anne Worden

(Faculty Librarian)

Email: anne.worden@port.ac.uk

Phone:(023) 9284 3243

Sharon Bittner

(Assistant Faculty Librarian)

Email: sharon.bittner@port.ac.uk

Phone:(023) 9284 3234